Wednesday, May 20, 2015

"THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" (2014) Review




"THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" (2014) Review

I have never been a major fan of Wes Anderson's films in the past. Well . . . I take that back. I have never been a fan of his films, with the exception of one - namely 2007's "THE DARJEELING LIMITED". Perhaps my inability to appreciate most of Anderson's films was due to my inability to understand his sense of humor . . . or cinematic style. Who knows? However, after viewing "THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL", the number of Anderson films of which I became a fan, rose to two. 

Written and directed by Anderson, "THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" is about the adventures of one Gustave H., a legendary concierge at a famous hotel from the fictional Republic of Zubrowka during the early 1930s; and his most trusted friend, a lobby boy named Zero Moustafa. Narrated from a much older Zero, the movie, which was inspired by the writings of Austrian author Stefan Zweig, begins in the present day in which a teenage girl stares at a monument inside a cemetery, who holds a memoir in her arms, written by a character known as "The Author". The book narrates a tale in which "the Author" as a younger man visited the Grand Budapest Hotel in 1968 Zubrowka. There, he met the hotel's elderly owner, Zero Moustafa, who eventually tells him how he took ownership of the hotel and why he is unwilling to close it down.

The story shifts to 1932, in which a much younger Zero was one of the hotel's lobby boys, freshly arrived in Zubrowka as a war refugee. Zero becomes acquainted with Monsieur Gustave H., who is a celebrated concierge known for sexually pleasing some of the hotel's wealthy guests - namely those who are elderly and romantically desperate. One of Gustave's guests is the very wealthy Madame Céline Villeneuve "Madame D" Desgoffe und Taxis. Although Zubrowka is on the verge of war, Gustave becomes more concerned with news that "Madame D" has suddenly died. He and Zero travels across the country to attend her wake and the reading of her will. During the latter, Gustave learns that "Madame D" has bequeathed to him a very valuable painting called "Boy with Apple". This enrages her family, all of whom hoped to inherit it. Not long after Gustave and Zero's return to the Grand Budapest Hotel, the former is arrested and imprisoned for the murder of the elderly woman, who had died of strychnine poisoning. Gustave and Zero team up to help the former escape from prison and learn who had framed him for murder.

"THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" not only proved to be very popular with critics, the film also earned four Golden Globe nominations and won one award - Best Film: Musical or Comedy. It also earned nine Academy Awards and won four. Not bad for a comedy about a mid-European concierge in the early 1930s. Did the movie deserved its accolades? In spades. It is the only other Wes Anderson movie I have ever developed a real love for. In fact, I think I enjoyed it even more than"THE DARJEELING LIMITED". When I first heard about the movie, I did not want to see it. I did not even want to give it a chance. Thank God I did. The movie not only proved to be my favorite Anderson film, it also became one of my favorite 2014 flicks. 

Is "THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" perfect? For a while, I found myself hard pressed to think of anything about this movie that may have rubbed me the wrong way. I realized there was one thing with which I had a problem - namely the way this movie began. Was it really necessary to star the movie with a young girl staring at a statue of "the Author", while holding his book? Was it really necessary to have "the Older Author" begin the movie's narration, before he is replaced by his younger self and the older Zero Moustafa? I realized what Anderson was trying to say. He wanted to convey to movie audiences that M. Gustave and Zero's story will continue on through the Author's book and they will never be forgotten. But I cannot help but wonder if Anderson could have conveyed his message without this gimmicky prologue.

"THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" may not be perfect. But I would certainly never describe it as a mediocre or even moderately good film. This movie deserved the Academy Award nominations and wins it earned . . . and many more. It was such a joy to watch it that not even its angst-filled moments could dampen my feelings. Anderson did a superb job of conveying his usual mixture of high comedy, pathos and quixotic touches in this film. Now, one might point out this is the director's usual style, which makes it nothing new. I would agree, except . . . I believe that Anderson's usual style perfectly blended with the movie's 1930s Central European setting. For me, watching "THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL"seemed like watching an Ernst Lubitsch movie . . . only with profanity and a bit of sexual situations and nudity.

I have only watched a handful of Lubitsch's movies and cannot recall any real violence or political situations featured in any of his plots. Wait . . . I take that back. His 1942 movie, "TO BE OR NOT TO BE" featured strong hints of violence, war and a touch of infidelity. However, I believe Anderson went a little further in his own depictions of war, violence and sex. But this did not harm the movie one bit. After all, "THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" was released in the early 21st century. Sex and violence is nothing new in today's films . . . even in highly acclaimed ones. Despite the presence of both in the film, Anderson still managed to infuse a great deal of wit and style into his plot. This was especially apparent in two sequences - Zero's initial description of M. Gustave and the Grand Budapest Hotel; and that marvelous sequence in which a fraternal order of Europe's hotel concierges known as the Society of the Crossed Keys helped Gustave and Zero evade the police and find the one person who can who can clear Gustave's name and help him retrieve his legacy from "Madame D". I especially enjoyed the last sequence. In my eyes, Lubitsch could not have done it any better.

There were other aspects of "THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL" that enhanced its setting. First of all, I have to give kudos to Adam Stockhausen and Anna Pinnock for their work on the movie. Stockhausen, who also served as the production designer for the Oscar winning film, "12 YEARS A SLAVE", did a superb job of reflecting the movie's two major time periods - Central Europe in the early 1930s and the late 1960s. Pinnock served as the film's set decorator. Both Stockhausen and Pinnock shared the Academy Award for Best Production Design. Milena Canonero won an Oscar for the film's costume designs. I have to admit that she deserved. I feel she deserved it, because she did an excellent job of creating costumes not only for the characters, but also their class positions and the movie's settings. She did not simply resort to re-creating the fashion glamour of the 1930s for the sake of eye candy. Robert Yeoman's photography for the movie really impressed me. I found it sharp and very atmospheric for the movie's setting. I can see why he managed to earn an Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography.

I was shocked when I learned that Ralph Fiennes failed to get an Academy Award nomination for his performance as M. Gustave. What on earth was the Academy thinking? I can think of at least two actor who were nominated for Best Actor for 2014, who could have been passed over. Gustave is Fiennes' masterpiece, as far as I am concerned. I never realized he had such a spot-on talent for comedy. And although his Gustave is one of the funniest characters I have seen in recent years, I was also impressed by the touch of pathos he added to the role. Another actor, who I also believe deserved an Oscar nomination was Tony Revolori. Where on earth did Anderson find this kid? Oh yes . . . Southern California. Well . . . Revolori was also superb as the young Zero, who not only proved to be a very devoted employee and friend to M. Gustave, but also a very pragmatic young man. Like Fiennes, Revolori had both an excellent touch for both comedy and pathos. Also, both he and Fiennes proved to have great screen chemistry.

Revolori also shared a solid screen chemistry with actress Saoirse Ronan, who portrayed Zero's lady love, pastry chef Agatha. Ronan's charming performance made it perfectly clear why Zero and even M. Gustave found Agatha's sharp-tongue pragmatism very alluring. Another charming performance came from Tilda Swinton, who portrayed one of Gustave's elderly lovers. It seemed a shamed that Swinton's appearance was short-lived. I found her portrayal of the wealthy, yet insecure and desperate Madame Céline Villeneuve Desgoffe und Taxis rather interesting. Adrien Brody gave an interesting performance as Dmitri Desgoffe und Taxis, Madame Villeneuve's son. I have never seen Brody portray a villain before. But I must say that I was impressed by the way he effectively portrayed Dmitri as a privileged thug. Willem Dafoe was equally interesting as Dmitri's cold-blooded assassin, J.G. Jopling. And Edward Norton struck me as both funny and scary as The movie also featured first-rate performances from Jeff Goldblum, Harvey Keitel, Mathieu Amalric, Jason Schwartzman, Léa Seydoux, Owen Wilson, Fisher Stevens, Bob Balaban and especially Bill Murray as Monsieur Ivan, Gustave's main contact with the Society of the Crossed Keys. The movie had three narrators - Tom Wilkinson as the Older Author, Jude Law as the Younger Author and F. Murray Abraham as the Older Zero. All three did great jobs, but I noticed that Wilkinson's time as narrator was very short-lived.

What else can I say about "THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL"? It is one of the few movies in which its setting truly blended with Wes Anderson's off-kilter humorous style. The movie not only benefited from great artistry from the crew and superb performances from a cast led by Ralph Fiennes and Tony Revolori, but also from the creative pen and great direction from Wes Anderson. Now, I am inspired to try my luck with some of his other films again.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Top Ten Favorite Movies Set in the 1890s

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Below is my current list of favorite movies set in the 1890s: 


TOP TEN FAVORITE MOVIES SET IN THE 1890s

1 - Sherlock Holmes-Game of Shadows

1. "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" (2011) - Guy Ritchie directed this excellent sequel to his 2009 hit, in which Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson confront their most dangerous adversary, Professor James Moriarty. Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law starred.



2 - Hello Dolly

2. "Hello Dolly!" (1969) - Barbra Streisand and Walter Matthau starred in this entertaining adaptation of David Merrick's 1964 play about a New York City matchmaker hired to find a wife for a wealthy Yonkers businessman. Gene Kelly directed.



3 - King Solomon Mines

3. "King Solomon’s Mines" (1950) - Stewart Granger, Deborah Kerr and Richard Carlson starred in this satisfying Oscar nominated adaptation of H. Rider Haggard's 1885 novel about the search for a missing fortune hunter in late 19th century East Africa. Compton Bennett and Andrew Marton directed.



4 - Sherlock Holmes

4. "Sherlock Holmes" (2009) - Guy Ritchie directed this 2009 hit about Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson's investigation of a series of murders connected to occult rituals. Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law starred.



5 - Hidalgo

5. "Hidalgo" (2004) - Viggo Mortensen and Omar Sharif starred in Disney's fictionalized, but entertaining account of long-distance rider Frank Hopkins' participation in the Middle Eastern race "Ocean of Fire". Joe Johnston directed.



Harvey Girls screenshot

6. "The Harvey Girls" (1946) - Judy Garland starred in this dazzling musical about the famous Harvey House waitresses of the late 19th century. Directed by George Sidney, the movie co-starred John Hodiak, Ray Bolger and Angela Landsbury.



6 - The Jungle Book 

7. "Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book" (1994) - Stephen Sommers directed this colorful adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's 1894 collection of short stories about a human boy raised by animals in India's jungles. Jason Scott Lee, Cary Elwes and Lena Headey starred.



7 - The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

8. "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" (2003) - Sean Connery starred in this adaptation of Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's first volume of his 1999-2000 comic book series about 19th century fictional characters who team up to investigate a series of terrorist attacks that threaten to lead Europe into a world war. Stephen Norrington directed.



8 - The Prestige

9. "The Prestige" (2006) - Christopher Nolan directed this fascinating adaptation of Christopher Priest's 1995 novel about rival magicians in late Victorian England. Christian Bale, Hugh Jackman and Michael Caine starred.



9 - An Ideal Husband

10. "An Ideal Husband" (1999) - Oliver Parker directed this charming adaptation of Oscar Wilde's 1895 stage play about a British government minister being blackmailed over a past misdeed. Rupert Everett, Jeremy Northam, Cate Blanchett, Julianne Moore and Minnie Driver starred.



10 - The Four Feathers 1939

Honorable Mention: "The Four Feathers" (1939) - Alexander Korda produced and Zoltan Korda directed this colorful adaptation of A.E.W. Mason's 1902 novel about a recently resigned British officer accused of cowardice. John Clements, June Duprez and Ralph Richardson starred.